One Step Closer

After two weeks of waiting for notes from the investors, I finally heard from my director saying they had agreed the script was good to go. (I have no idea what the investors concerns were, or how the producers overcame them.) They have a casting director on board, and are now moving toward a sales agreement.  As one producer said, “I feel like we have some good momentum going forward.”

This is generally good news.

As the option was due to expire at the end of May, the producers asked to extend it while they proceed. Not an unusual request. My last two options needed to be extended because things started happening just as it was coming down to the wire.

I’m feeling encouraged.  It’s ‘found money’ in my pocket. But the champagne is still on ice.

I’m cautiously optimistic, because this has been my experience with the option and development phase in the past. It’s a heady moment to have someone say, “We LOVE it, and want to BUY/OPTION it!” Because, hey – a money offer is a great validation. It sits heavier in your hand than the trophies, accolades and plaques from contest wins.  And when the option check clears the bank, I DO allow a bit of a celebration. “One step closer.”

But I’ve been here before. “Just… This… Close…” to  a BIG deal, with a BIG name… only to have it slip away.

I’m not complaining. As an actor, I know how great it feels to get a callback to an audition. And then a second callback with maybe a screen test read with the lead. You can ‘smell it’, the role is real. Then, for whatever reason – they go another direction. Maybe the funding fell through. Maybe they’ve decided on a different take. It’s not ‘personal’, as hard as it is to understand that. You pat yourself on the back for making it that far. You learn from the process. What did you do right? What might you have done differently? What can you use the NEXT time you’re in this position?

It’s the same thing basically, with the option process. You have to let go of what you can’t control. My most difficult lesson to learn, always.  Work on what I CAN control; the next script, how I pitch, my daily writing routine.

I have to rest in the assurance one of the producers gave me.

“Thanks for your patience with us, we’re busy working behind the scenes and want this project to be the strongest it can be while staying true to the world you created.”

True to the world ‘I created.’

That’s heady stuff.

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